Star Wars is such a gargantuan franchise at this point that it’s basically impossible for a single movie to say and do everything a filmmaker wants, incorporating every character, place, and event that means something to fans.

And so, perhaps more than any other IP in history, Star Wars does much of its storytelling at the periphery, sneakily revealing fascinating plot points in the background, whether by implication or by intelligent visual signage.

It’s a tough trick to pull off, but with the Star Wars fan base being as insatiable and eagle-eyed as they are, they’ve literally caught dozens of low-level narrative tricks at the over the decades.

Picking just 10 plot points isn’t easy, even though they’re the ones that flesh out the Star Wars universe the most, giving emotion and meaning to its characters and maybe even making you think of scenes. in a completely different way.

Needless to say, you’ll never watch the world of Star Wars enough in the same way after considering these silent plot points, each of which says it, so much without saying anything at all…

You’ll probably remember that in The Empire Strikes Back, R2-D2 demonstrates a habit of disobeying Luke Skywalker’s (Mark Hamill) orders to stay put and stay with the ship.

While at first glance it might seem like nothing more than R2-D2 being a fun, independent droid who wants to help his charge complete his mission, the much sadder truth is actually subtly explained in the prequels.

In Revenge of the Sith, when Anakin (Hayden Christensen) lands on Mustafar with R2 in tow, he tells him to stay with the ship. Except in this case, R2 obeys Anakin’s request, only for Anakin to subsequently become Darth Vader and never return to R2.

This apparently caused R2 to develop understandable abandonment issues, and so in the events of the original trilogy, he’s not about to sit around and wait for a human who may or may not abandon him.

While we could technically attribute this to George Lucas developing the plot point retrospectively in the prequels, it’s still totally effective in explaining R2’s distaste for conformity.